No Good Vs. Yes Good

Creative paranoia: when you know, just know, your work is worthless in a way only others can see.

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2019/09/21 17:00

The last few days were a multi-car pileup of work, family things, a few long-overdue household details, and so on. Not much time to get to the keys; it was only the other night I got any actual work done on Fall Of The Hammer. Of everything I've worked on until now, this story has easily had the most drawn-out and fragmented genesis; I suspect I'll be polishing it non-stop until its final release.

Some of that has me worried if, until now, I've been writing badly and just this project, because of its peculiarity and intractability, forced me to level up to a point where only now am I writing anything halfway okay.

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Tags: creativity  creators  writers  writing 


Doing The You Thing

On defending that original burst of inspiration to the death.

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2019/09/11 17:00

My post from before inspired another thought worth following up on: I am politely skeptical of, but also fundamentally fond of, the idea that the initial burst of inspiration we have about things is worth defending from being refined until nothing remains.

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Tags: creativity  inspiration  writers  writing 


I Owe An Excuse

What's the difference between an appreciation of something and making excuses for it?

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2019/09/11 08:00

Some of the best, most probing questions come from people who don't know the territory at all, or know it only well enough to ignore its dogmas. I was once talking with an acquaintance about how the more you read a favorite book, the better you appreciate it, when he came out with a question along the lines of, "How can you tell if you're just making excuses for a work once you've read it more than once?" He was in part following up something I'd said earlier in the conversation, about how you can make excuses for any work if you like it, and I admitted he had a point. One he made in almost complete ignorance of how such things work, but a point all the same. I wasn't sure how to reply to him then, but I think I do now.

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Tags: criticism  critics 


Doowutchalike, Part Three Hundred And Six

What is the good, and bad, in saying "I do what I dang well want" in any creative medium? I know there's both.

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2019/09/10 08:00

Whatever, Whatever, I Do What I Want :: Matthew Buscemi

An interesting post popped up in my Reddit feed earlier this week. In brief, the author describes their liberating exhilaration upon discovering that they did not, in fact, need to approach their writing with a sense of style any longer....

Writers should be well enough read to be able to recognize various kinds of styles, and they should have an idea of what kind of style they are aiming to have, even if, during their first draft of a piece, they sometimes need to push through some parts in a "spewy" sort of way and clean it up later. But don't declare that a writer can simply stop caring about style, or that style is arbitrary or a form of social oppression. That's just juvenile.

I've wrestled with this one a lot in the past: What is the good, and bad, in saying "I do what I want" in any creative medium? I know there's both, and Matt touches on both in his take. My take, from his take, is that trying to figure out where that divide lies is itself a hallmark of creative growth.

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Tags: creativity  creators  writers  writing 


Short Of My Own Mark

A good critic of other work makes me look at my own and feel like I've missed even the standards I wanted to set for myself.

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2019/09/06 17:00

I've been reading Gilbert Sorrentino's Something Said, a compilation of his criticism over the years, and it's another reminder of how a really good critic makes you say "It's always been like that, hasn't it? I just never saw it." It also makes me look at my own work and feel like I've missed even the standards I wanted to set for myself. Maybe the feeling will pass, but once such a thing is awakened it rarely nods back off on its own.

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Tags: Gilbert Sorrentino  Hubert Selby Jr.  John Updike  William Carlos Williams  criticism  writers  writing 


Beat Zen, Square Zen, And Fad Zen

If someone is now interested in something that once only had faddish appeal, their interest has a far greater chance of being genuine.

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2019/09/05 17:00

In one of his stories, Primo Levi (by way of a fictional narrator) talks about a slew of fads that have come and gone, with Zen Buddhism being one of them. I was not sure exactly when the story was written — my guess was last Sixties, early Seventies — but I didn't take offense at the description. I knew what he was referring to. Maybe even from the inside.

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Tags: Zen  popular culture 


We'll Always Have The Avengers

Ubiquitous cultural things don't thrill me, because they're in no danger of vanishing.

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2019/09/05 08:00

Maybe I make too much sometimes of an affected indifference to what goes on in mainstream culture. It wasn't until very recently that I figured out why I have a hard time getting very excited about something everyone else is excited about: it's because such things are in no danger of ever vanishing.

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Tags: media  popular culture 


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